Is One Glass Of Wine Equals One hour At The Gym?

So much buzz has been around recently about the finding that drinking wine has the same affect on our body as going to the gym. Before we skip the gym and have a drink, what’s real and whats not?

If you’ve been on social media at all this year, you may have seen posts titled “New study says a glass of red wine is equal to an hour at the gym.” We were all thrilled to hear it! If we’re short on time, we could just drink a glass of wine instead of running on the treadmill and get the same benefits, right?

But for now, enjoy your glass of wine per day for its other health benefits, not as a replacement for your cardio.

To all our dismay, this click-bait headline is unfortunately too good to be true. The headline and various articles based on it take some giant leaps based on the following scientific study:

V. W. Dolinsky, K. E. Jones, R. S. Sidhu, M. Haykowsky, M. P. Czubryt, T. Gordon, J. R. B. Dyck. Improvements in skeletal muscle strength and cardiac function induced by resveratrol during exercise training contribute to enhanced exercise performance in rats. The Journal of Physiology, 2012; 590 (11): 2783

This study, in a nutshell, shows evidence that adding resveratrol to the diet of rats improved the exercise performance of sedentary rats by ~25%, and also that adding resveratrol to the diet of active rats improved the active rats’ exercise performance by ~20%. Resveratrol improved exercise performance in both sedentary and active rats.

First of all, it is important to note that this study was done in rats, not humans. Though there are many similarities between rats and humans, and animal research is an important preliminary step in testing various compounds, medicines, treatments, etc. and predicting how they may affect humans, these findings are still preliminary, and to date no research has been done on the effects of resveratrol on exercise performance in humans.

Also, this study was not done on red wine, but was done on the compound resveratrol, which is an antioxidant found in red wine and some fruits, berries, and nuts. The rats’ diets were supplemented daily with resveratrol at the rate of 146mg of resveratrol per kilogram of the rat’s body weight.

If you translate this to an average human body weight of 150 pounds/68 kilograms, a human would have to consume 9,928mg of resveratrol to have the equivalent amount that the rats consumed in this study. A glass of red wine contains 0.2 to 2.0mg of resveratrol. This means that if a human drank wine with the max 2.0mg of resveratrol per glass, a human would have to drink almost FIVE THOUSAND (4,964 to be exact) glasses of wine in a day to have an the equivalent amount to the rats in the study! Drinking that amount of wine is obviously impossible, and even the resveratrol supplements are only a maximum of 900mg, still not enough to be the equivalent amount as to what was used in the rats.

There are also no published studies on the safe or effective dose of resveratrol on humans, nor the effects of long-term use of resveratrol in humans.

Though the findings of this and other studies of resveratrol in animals show encouraging results, more research on humans is needed. But for now, enjoy your glass of wine per day for its other health benefits, not as a replacement for your cardio.

Sources:

V. W. Dolinsky, K. E. Jones, R. S. Sidhu, M. Haykowsky, M. P. Czubryt, T. Gordon, J. R. B. Dyck. Improvements in skeletal muscle strength and cardiac function induced by resveratrol during exercise training contribute to enhanced exercise performance in rats. The Journal of Physiology, 2012; 590 (11): 2783

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/diet-rich-resveratrol-offers-health-boost-201405157153

The information written here is the opinion of the writer and is not the opinion of ActivewearUSA. Always consult a physician before engaging in any physical activity. In addition, ActivewearUSA does not encourage alcohol consumption. Always drink responsibly.




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